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Until the 2020 presidential election was finally decided, words never seemed to cause consequence for Donald Trump. Unlike any political candidate in recent memory, Trump seemed immune to harm from multiple arrogant, hateful, narcissistic, sexist, and foolish utterings. I won’t repeat them here; anyone can enter “Trump’s infamous quotes” or similar search term in his or her browser of choice.

During the 2016 election campaign, Hillary Clinton spoke at a fundraiser, and made this prophetic remark:

“To just be grossly generalistic, you could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables, Right? The racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic—you name it. And, unfortunately. there are people like that. And he has lifted them up.”

Clinton was almost immediately attacked for her words (mainly by Trump campaign pundits). Trump supporters all over the country wondered aloud whether their lifestyles qualified them as “deplorables”. Political experts opined that the comment cost Clinton the election.

While Clinton’s statement was overbroad (the 50% part), her message was clear. She was concerned that Trump’s offensive rhetoric was firing up far right white nationalists, the Proud Boys, QAnon, the KKK, and more. The president’s more “normal” supporters not only ignored her warning, they vilified her for it. The Republican Party embraced their candidate and basked in his ultimate victory.

Fast forward to last Wednesday when Hillary’s deplorables descended on our nation’s Capital building, desecrated it, threatened our congressional leaders and vice president, injured our citizens and police officers, and directly caused or contributed to five tragic deaths. I’ve been watching the news almost 24/7 since the events of January 6th, and I have not heard a single mention of Hillary Clinton’s grave warning.

Not only has President Trump’s words finally cost him an election, they are now responsible for causing insurrection, sedition, injury, destruction, and death not seen in this country since the War of 1812 when the British destroyed the Capital. As someone who has criticized the president, almost from the moment he assumed office, I’d like to be pleased that he is finally getting his comeuppance. He has lost the election, refused to accept the election results, spouted crazy conspiracy theories, delayed a peaceful transition of power, and placed our nation in peril. I cannot take pleasure in these events. We are dangerously close to imploding from within. Law enforcement officials are warning that inauguration day poses a major threat to our new president, our capital, and fifty state capitals around the country.

America should have heeded Hilary Clinton’s warnings. While her 50% estimate was over-the-top and insulting to Trump supporters, her evaluation of the danger our nation faced from these deplorables is now undeniable.

Our leaders continue to play politics in the face of grave danger. History is being made before our very eyes. Our grandchildren and great-grandchildren will study 2020 and 2021 in their American History classes as a classic example of how divisive rhetoric can cause anarchy. A vindictive president of the United States was impeached twice, lost an election, refused to concede and accept the results, and, for spite, inspired an attack on the foundations of our government. Despite his vile words and actions, and the actions of his deplorable supporters, 140 Republican Congressmen and women objected to the election results. Only 10 brave Republican voted to impeach him. Conviction in the Senate is unlikely.

Donald Trump once famously asked a crowd at one his many rallies: “What do you have to lose by trying something new, like Trump?” Sadly, now, we know. We have lost the soul of America. Perhaps President Biden can begin the restoration process. I wish him well.

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